Resources

Resources

The Oslo Forum process strives to critically examine the current practice of conflict mediation. The themes raised at each event are intended to provoke discussions, suggest interesting questions and propose new or unconventional approaches. 

Background papers and interviews are prepared prior to the retreats to set the tone for discussions and to sensitise participants to current debates and innovative ideas.

Background papers and interviews do not represent the positions of the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs or the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue (HD).

Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
Asia Mediators' Retreat 2006 - Background Paper - Peace with the Moros of the Philippines: An independent assessment
Abstract

Established in 1984, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) is a breakaway group of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF). The MILF rejects the peace pact the MNLF signed with the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) on September 2, 1996. Specifically, the MILF considers the political autonomy granted to the Moro people under the 1996 GRP-MNLF Final Peace Agreement as inadequate and unresponsive to the root causes of the conflict. Thus, even as Manila was negotiating with the MNLF, the MILF quietly built up its armed forces and mass base of supporters.

by
Benedicto R. Bacani,
26 Nov 2006
Asia Mediators' Retreat 2006 - Background Paper - Peace building in the Pacific Islands: Lessons from Bougainville, Solomon Islands and Fiji
Abstract

This paper examines lessons about efforts to build peace from three very different conflicts - Bougainville, in Papua New Guinea (PNG), Solomon Islands and Fiji. These three island states share characteristics common to the states of the southwest Pacific region known as Melanesia. They have small populations (PNG 5.5 million, Fiji 850,000, Solomon Islands 400,000), possess remarkable cultural and linguistic diversity, experienced a late imposition of colonial rule, emerged recently from colonialism - Fiji in 1970, PNG in 1975, and Solomon Islands in 1978 - and share weak economies and states inherited from reluctant colonial powers.

by
David Hegarty and Anthony Regan,
26 Nov 2006
Asia Mediators' Retreat 2006 - Background Paper - Myanmar: The limits to international mediation
Abstract

Since Myanmar's military leaders seized power in a bloody coup more than eighteen years ago, the international community has tried to restore democracy to the country through a combination of dialogue, engagement, goading and sanctions. Asia (largely China, India and ASEAN), the West (Europe and the US) and the UN have all taken key roles in this process of either encouraging or putting pressure on Myanmar to reform. But the main problem has always been the major disagreement between those who favour sanctions and those who believe the only way to encourage change, is to engage the regime rather than isolate them. This paper takes a look at these efforts in order to reflect upon the broader question of possible limits to external engagement. In conclusion, several policy options are put forward.

by
Larry Jagan,
26 Nov 2006
Oslo Forum 2007 - Background Paper - Avoiding the worst case scenario: Iran and the real possibilities of engagement
Abstract

This briefing paper seeks to argue that alternative options are available, principally through a political route, but that Western policymakers must empower and equip themselves through the (re)acquisition of knowledge and the realities on the ground. Only this will allow for a proactive policy of engagement, with clear goals and objectives that are achievable with the Iran that exists, and not only the Iran which is imagined.

by
Ali M. Ansari,
1 Jun 2007
Africa Mediators' Retreat 2007 - Background Paper - Mediation efforts in Africa’s Great Lakes Region
Abstract

This paper reviews the mediation experiences by presenting a chronology that starts from Kenyan President Daniel Arap Moi's intervention in Uganda's civil war in 1985 and ends with Botswana's former President Ketumile Masire's mediation of the conflict in the DRC in 2002. This chronology of experiences depicts African actors gradually learning how to manage mediation roles, witnessed in the practice of presidents ceding mediation functions to elder statesmen and special envoys.

by
Gilbert M. Khadiagala,
22 Apr 2007

Pages

Updates

2nd Oslo Forum Peacewriter Prize

The Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue (HD) is launching the second edition of the Oslo Forum Peacewriter Prize, an essay competition seeking bold and innovative responses to today’s peacemaking challenges.