Resources

Resources

The Oslo Forum process strives to critically examine the current practice of conflict mediation. The themes raised at each event are intended to provoke discussions, suggest interesting questions and propose new or unconventional approaches. 

Background papers and interviews are prepared prior to the retreats to set the tone for discussions and to sensitise participants to current debates and innovative ideas.

Background papers and interviews do not represent the positions of the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs or the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue (HD).

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Asia Mediators' Retreat 2008 - Background paper - The Korean Peninsula conflict: Mediation in the midst of a changing regional order
Abstract

As divided Korea turns sixty-three, the Korean peninsula conflict seems like one of the most protracted and unmediated of its kind since the end of World War II. Yet, over the post-Cold War years, especially since the coming of the Kim Dae Jung administration in 1998, each has also developed mechanisms that allow it to function as a “normal” state in the international community. This paper seeks to assess the possibilities and limitations of third-party mediation in the resolution of the Korean peninsula conflict.

by
Samuel S. Kim,
16 Mar 2008
Oslo Forum 2008 - Background paper - Gender sensitivity: nicety or necessity in peace process management?
Abstract

This paper offers examples of how issues in peace processes can be treated in a gender- sensitive manner, an exercise that is surprisingly simple yet can yield rich analytical results. The arguments in this paper are based principally on the practical experience of professionals currently or recently involved in the management of peace processes in Aceh, Kenya, Kosovo, Liberia, the Middle East, Nepal, Northern Ireland, the Sudan/Darfur and Uganda, together with some secondary academic research and analysis. This paper explores what peace-process actors, including mediators, have done to make peace processes more sensitive to gender, what else might be done, and the benefits (and costs, if any) of such strategies.

by
Antonia Potter,
23 Jun 2008
Oslo Forum 2008 - Background paper - It ain’t over ’til it’s over: what role for mediation in post-agreement contexts?
Abstract

International mediation is conventionally treated as the reserve of peace processes which, once culminating in a peace agreement, are expected to progress to implementation and various forms of post-conflict recovery in which mediation would have little or no part. Many have criticised the degree to which mediators focus on getting a deal and getting out, leaving the messy business of implementing those deals to others, at least until the deals fray or come apart, requiring new rounds of mediation.
This paper examines whether there may also be a role for mediation-like efforts in relation to post-agreement dialogue processes or similar efforts to broaden popular support for a settlement.

by
Elizabeth Cousens,
23 Jun 2008
Oslo Forum 2008 - Background paper - Power-sharing, transitional governments and the role of mediation
Abstract

Power-sharing transitional governments are common ingredients of peacemaking and peacebuilding efforts. This paper focuses on the sharing of power in the transitional executive and legislature, and argues that the international community has an important role to play in assisting power-sharing governments to manage their countries’ political transition.

by
Katia Papagianni,
23 Jun 2008
Oslo Forum 2008 - Background paper - China's role in the mediation and resolution of conflict in Africa
Abstract

The salience of China in relation to Darfur has generated a paradox in popular perceptions whereby China is seen as both the cause and the potential solution to an armed conflict. Such a black-and-white view may make effective ammunition for advocacy, but China’s role in Sudan and the African continent more generally is actually more complex. This paper offers a short assessment of China’s role in the mediation and resolution of conflict in Africa, with Darfur used as a key example – in many ways forming the exception to the wider rule.

by
Dan Large,
23 Jun 2008

Pages

Updates

Understanding fragmentation in conflict and its impact on prospects for peace
Kathleen Gallagher Cunningham highlights a number of key findings about fragmentation and conflict, and the role of mediation in fragmented conflicts. Drawing on a range of contemporary and historical examples from global conflicts, the author examines the consequences of fragmentation for...

2017
 Forum