Resources

Resources

The Oslo Forum process strives to critically examine the current practice of conflict mediation. The themes raised at each event are intended to provoke discussions, suggest interesting questions and propose new or unconventional approaches. 

Background papers and interviews are prepared prior to the retreats to set the tone for discussions and to sensitise participants to current debates and innovative ideas.

Background papers and interviews do not represent the positions of the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs or the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue (HD).

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Oslo Forum 2008 - Briefing Paper - Against conventional wisdom: mediating the Arab-Israeli conflict
Abstract

Usually described as the core conflict in the Middle East, and with obvious impact on international peace and security, the Arab–Israeli conflict seems to cry out for mediation. However, Israel has consistently maintained that the conflict is better dealt with directly and exclusively by the parties, with little or no external interference, and its view has become a conventional wisdom in the Arab–Israeli peacemaking community since the mid-1970s. This paper argues against this wisdom.

by
Ezzedine Choukri-Fishere,
23 Jun 2008
Oslo Forum 2008 - Briefing Paper - A role for the private sector in peace processes? Examples and implications for third party mediation
Abstract

The role of the private sector in different aspects of conflict resolution has received increasing attention in recent years. This paper discusses the diverse roles played by the private sector during Track 1 peace processes in particular, drawing on a variety of examples from different contexts. The examples illustrate that where the private sector enjoys credibility (sometimes higher than state parties), has access to conflict parties, and a strategic interest in the resolution of a conflict, it can become actively involved and have significant impact on the course of a peace process, for better or worse.

by
Salil Tripathi and Canan Gündüz,
23 Jun 2008

Pages

Updates

Understanding fragmentation in conflict and its impact on prospects for peace
Kathleen Gallagher Cunningham highlights a number of key findings about fragmentation and conflict, and the role of mediation in fragmented conflicts. Drawing on a range of contemporary and historical examples from global conflicts, the author examines the consequences of fragmentation for...

2017
 Forum